Tribalogy – Drawing With Both Hands at the Same Time

For the greater part of my life, I have been drawing with my right hand only. Several years ago, I had an idea for a fun artistic challenge. One day, I decided to include my left hand into the drawing process. I refer to this as “Simultaneous, Two Handed Drawing”- the act of drawing with both hands at the same time.

You might be asking, “how could this be possible and how can you focus on both hands at the same time?”. The answer is this: the same way you drive a car, play an instrument, or type on a keyboard. We train our brains to function and operate in a way that allows us to accomplish specific tasks.

The truth is that everyone can draw with both hands at once. It’s simply a matter of the willingness to learn, as well as being inspired to take on the task. Everyone is different, and we all have abilities that make us unique.

For me, I have been drawing my whole life and I have been heavily inspired by the lines and shapes prevalent in Tribal art. I have practiced drawing, painting and tattooing tribal designs for, literally, thousands of hours in my life.

My goal has always been in developing a fundamental understanding for the science of interacting lines and shapes on a surface. Incorporating my other hand in the art creation process seemed to be the next step in connecting with line art on a deeper, more spiritual level.

Drawing with both hands seemed to allow me to get even closer to becoming one with the lines and shapes that I created. I started to draw tribal art with both hands at once, and Tribalogy was born. After creating several simultaneous, two handed drawings, I noticed my hands making similar movements on the paper, and new drawing techniques were born.

These include Hand Mirroring, Hand Independence, Detachment, Alternating, Overlapping,Tempo, and so on. The drawing methods would come to me, as though they had always been there, and as if I was uncovering them through drawing experimentation. Drawing with two hands seems to hold a lot of answers regarding the art creation process. It feels like I am closing an electrical circuit, allowing art to flow freely into the design, then back into me.

I believe that an artist who creates art with one hand is just as close to their art as the two handed artist. Incorporating my other hand seems to be the missing force in my individual process.

Music As a Form of Entertainment

Music like any other form of art is a great form of entertainment for you. Your blues, emo, indie, folk or music videos are a great source of fun for you and your loved ones. Whether it’s an African village enjoying the live beats of the drum or a club in the middle of New York, the effect is the same. The music does it all for them.

You can enjoy a great time with music as a form of fun by dancing. Simply get up and take to the floor. When listening to your blues, emo or folk songs there is no better way for you to express your feeling that shaking what you’ve got. Just let your hair down for a moment and let the music take you. You are sure to enjoy it every time you get on the floor. Music causes you to just want to move. It stirs within you slowly until you can’t hold still no more.

You can also enjoy music by simply watching the artists do what they love. You enjoy musicals and operas this way. The music just causes you to sit still and enjoy. The moment is like an experience out of this world. For a moment you forget about everything else. You focus on the music. The indie, folk or alternative songs capture your consciousness. It’s like a musical trance. You feel it in your inner most being. That’s how music entertains you.

Even without having to go out for that opera or musical, you know that music will still entertain you wherever you are. You can have a great time just sitting and listening to your best emo or indie CD right in your living room. Call your friends to enjoy the moment with you. It lightens the mood and makes you all laugh without a care in the world. It’s even okay if you choose to dance right in the middle of your living room. The music transforms an uneventful and boring evening into one you are sure not to forget.

Music entertains you quite well in clubs and discos. If going out is your cup of tea, you know how much fun this is. When the music is playing out loud and the lighting adds to the effect you can’t help but enjoy. Everything goes here. While sipping on your favorite drink and whispering at your friend’s ear, you know that you don’t want the evening to end. The indie, folk, alternative or emo songs played for you make the atmosphere just as you want it to be. At this point, you unleash your vivacious side and you can confidently ask that guy, “want to dance?” This is because you’re really entertained.

Music as a form of entertainment is evident in celebrations and special occasions. You know how without the folk, emo or indie music at your best friend’s graduation you would have had a drab time. You can swear that the only reason you stayed was because of the music.

History of Ear Gauging in Tribal Civilizations

A study of the history of ear gauging indicates the practice to be as old as recorded human history. For males, this form of ear piercing has been a symbol of status, while for women, in addition to being used as means of bodily decoration, it has also been employed to signify the attainment of womanhood.

Ear gauging, which is also referred to as ear stretching, is the stretching of ear lobe piercings to larger diameters than that of the original piercing. It is a form of body enhancement or beautification that many young western people adopt to look ‘different’ from the usual crowd. However, this is not a modern form of body piercing, since it has been around for as long as archaeological records exist.

In many cases, ear gauging has been used historically to indicate the standing of members of a specific tribe, and in many respects this is still the situation today. Stretched piercings have been, and still are, a reflection on the individual’s sexual capability and also their superiority over other males in the tribe. The larger the stretching, the more important the individual.

Otzi the Iceman is a prime example of mummies known to have stretched ears. This is the earliest known example of ear gauging, Otzi having 7-11 mm ear piercings during 3300 BC. It has been suggested that the stretching of the ears noted in depictions of Siddhartha Gautama, better known as Buddha, may have been caused by the weight of the gold jewelry he wore, but this is mere supposition.

It is supported, however, by the fact that the Masai tribe of Kenya and the Lahu and Karen-Paduang people of Thailand use this ‘gravity’ technique to stretch their piercings. Let us have a look at the ear gauging practices used today by various cultures.

A. Mursi Tribal Women

The Mursi is an Ethiopian tribe where the women are obliged to wear plates in their gauged ears and on their bottom lip. About a year prior to her marriage, or at about 15 years of age, a Mursi girl’s lip will be pierced by her mother and a wooden peg pushed through the incision.

Once healed, the peg is changed for a larger diameter one. Eventually, the peg is replaced by a plate of clay or wood, and this plate is successively changed for larger diameter ones until the required diameter is attained – from around 8 – 22 cm in diameter (3 – 9 inches). Once these plates have been secured, she receives a higher degree of respect than those without them, and is known as a ‘Bhansanai’.

These lip and ear plates need not be worn permanently, but are an expected adornment during special occasions such as during weddings and other celebrations, and when they serve food to men. Today, young women can generally make their own decision as to whether or not they follow this tradition.

B. The Masai People of Kenya

The practice of ear gauging has been common among Masai men and women for thousands of years. In recent years, however, most young men have not been following this custom, although you will still find many Masai women wearing ear decorations made from stones, cross-cut elephant tusks, wood and animal bones.

The original piercing is carried out using a thorn, sharpened twig or a sharp knife point. Once healed, ear gauging is then carried out by wearing increasingly heavy jewellery that pulls the lobe down and stretches the piercing. This is the traditional way of gauging ears in the more primitive cultures, although many Masai today will use proper ear gauging techniques, such as their own versions of insertion tapers or taper spikes. Beads are a common form of ornamentation, although plugs made from bone, tusks and wood are also used.

C. The African Fulani Tribe

Fulani women from Nigeria and Central Africa tend to use smaller diameter ear gauges, and decorate them using large gold domes or hoops carrying earrings. A Fulani child will have her ears pierced at around 3 years old, although they may not be stretched until she is older. The gauges used by Fulani women are relatively small compared to the Masai and Mursi, although the jewellery can be larger.

D. Asian Hill Tribes

Of the various hill tribes, the only two known to practice ear gauging are the Lahu from Thailand, and the Karen-Padaung (Longnecks) from Myanmar (Burma) and also the Phrae province in Thailand. That latter tribe are best known for their neck rings, offering the appearance of long necks, but both cultures believe the ear to be sacred and the more jewellery they can wear on the better. By gauging their ears, they are able to wear the maximum amount of jewellery they believe possible.

E. Mexican and Central American Civilizations

In Mayan and Aztec society, ear gauging was regarded as desirable for males. There are many Mayan representations of men with flares and ear plugs (ear spools) in gauged ears, and the material used was indicative of the social standing of the wearer. Jade ear plugs were worn by the higher classes, while the rest would use bone, stone, wood and other materials. In central Mexico, the craftsmanship of the Aztecs is evident in the ear gauging plugs and ornaments of gold and silver, though the lower classes would adorn their stretches earlobes with shells, copper and wood among many other imaginative materials.

Ear gauging has been carried out worldwide, and among other notable areas involved in this practice are Japan, where the Ainu used ear jewellery made from shells, bone and a ball and ring known as Ninkari. There are many other cultures worldwide where ear gauging was a part of their life, and even today many people regard ear stretching as a fashion statement and a way of expressing their own personality and individuality.

Nose Rings, Studs And Bones – Which Is For You?

Nose piercings have become very popular among people who are in favour of surface piercings; nose rings, studs and balls are actually second in popularity after ear piercings. Although there are more women who have pierced noses than men, someone who wears a nostril piercing is making a personal statement for him- or herself. A successful piercing means someone followed their nose piercing aftercare instructions.

Nose piercings have a common place among the cultures of India as well as most parts of the middle east. As a matter of fact, in India and in some parts of the middle east, a man gives a woman he is about to marry a nose ring which is the western world’s equivalent of a wedding ring. These days, nose bones are quite a bit popular. A woman would only need to turn her head for other people and men in particular to understand that she is already married.

Should you decide that you would like to go and get your nostril pierced, there are actually a couple of nose rings, studs and bones that you can choose from. There is the screw that starts as a straight stud but has hooks as well as curves so you would not be able to easily pull it out regardless of how much you pull at it. This particular stud is put in through the nostril by slowly inserting and is carefully removed through the fleshy part of the nostril. A nose bone on the other hand is a kind of stud that has a large round part at one end that is pushed through the nostril so that the jewelry is kept in its place.

There are a lot of people who advise against using a nose bone when you decide to go ahead and have your nose pierced for the first time. Because of the way a nose bone is designed, there is a distinct possibility that the shaft of the stud will be too short to get completely through a nostril that happens to be a little thicker than the average person. Even if a pierce is accomplished completely through the flesh, does not mean that the subsequent swelling won’t swallow the nose bone. If the interior face of the piercing heals over, the nose bone may have to be removed surgically.

When you wear nose bone jewelry, your nose’s wound would heal around the stud that is pierced through your nostril, with the egg-shaped end, which is somewhat larger than the shaft, this makes it very difficult to remove and can even slow down or worse – reverse the healing process because if you move it around or try to take it off, you would tear at the healing tissue, causing another wound. Piercers more often than not recommend that you opt for a nose screw instead during the beginning. A nose screw that is made of surgical stainless steel or if you can afford to have one, an eighteen karat gold nose screw.